The Skeleton Dance and the Danse Macabre

The Skeleton Dance is a 1929 Silly Symphonies animated short subject produced and directed by Walt Disney and animated by Ub Iwerks. In the film, four human skeletons dance and make music around a spooky graveyard – a modern film example of medieval European “danse macabre” imagery. It is the first entry in the Silly Symphonies series. (Wikipedia)

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The Dance of Death (1493) by Michael Wolgemut, from the Liber chronicarum by Hartmann Schedel.

Dance of Death, also variously called Danse Macabre (French), Danza Macabra (Italian), Dansul Morţii (Romanian), Danza de la Muerte (Spanish), Dansa de la Mort (Catalan), Dança Macabra (Portuguese language), Totentanz (German), Dodendans (Dutch), Surmatants (Estonian), is an artistic genre of late-medievalallegory on the universality of death: no matter one’s station in life, the Dance of Death unites all. The Danse Macabre consists of the dead or personified Death summoning representatives from all walks of life to dance along to the grave, typically with a pope, emperor, king, child, and labourer. They were produced to remind people of the fragility of their lives and how vain were the glories of earthly life.[1] Its origins are postulated from illustrated sermon texts; the earliest recorded visual scheme was a now lost mural in the Saints Innocents Cemetery in Paris dating from 1424–25. (Wikipedia)